Posted in Uncategorized

Near Miss

Wow! There is nothing like the threat of an approaching hurricane to make you take stock of your garden.

This past weekend Hurricane Isaias quickly formed in the Atlantic ocean and headed for the Florida coast. There was no 4-5 day preparation with this storm. Luckily it broke apart before it could do much of anything, and passed us by, just offshore.

Even though we decided to not put up our hurricane shutters, there was still work to be done. And every time we have to do this, we moan about all the garden “stuff” my husband and I have added to our yard.

one of my many orchids

So, we start with the orchids. I had just repotted them together in large wood orchid baskets, so that cut the number down considerably, but there were still a couple dozen that had to be taken out of the trees and placed in a protected area. Then there was the shade sail (shade cloth) my husband put up over my fountain to protect more orchids and foliage plants from the summer sun.

Then we move to the decorative pieces. Wind chimes hang in the larger trees and had to be taken down and laid low into the bushes. The wind spinners were taken apart and placed in a corner, and we gathered the decorative statues and animals into the garage. The large umbrella that covers the table and chair was tied up and laid on the ground.

the backyard is the last to clean up; we want to keep the animals happen as long as we can.

The lawn furniture and cushions had to be stacked in a protected corner of the front porch, and finally the bird baths were emptied and turned upside down. I held out until the last possible moment before taking down the bird feeders. Which were also the first things to go back up. The bluejays sat outside my window, all but tapping on the glass for food when the winds died down.

The largest potted plants were laid on their side to keep the wind from snapping them in half, and they were also watered for extra weight.

And then we “hunker down” and wait for the storm to pass. Of course, with a storm that was stronger, there would be more work to do; put up the shutters, get gas for the generator, mow the lawn, and the list goes on.

Then, after the go ahead is given, we return everything to its rightful place until the next storm is approaching. And each time we promise ourself, we will get rid of the lawn art and make our life simpler.

But we don’t. Because the storms are for brief intervals, over quickly and with the promise of better days ahead. Creating the garden we love to be in takes time, effort and patience. And the knowledge that the storms will pass and better weather is just around the corner to enjoy.

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

Little Gardeners

 

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I spent many hours helping my parents in our garden when I was younger, not always because I wanted to either. And my weekends weren’t always free from weeding and trimming; those are the times we went to help my grandparents with their garden work. All-in-all, they were happy memories, and they taught me a lot of good lessons about responsibility and how nature grows.
kids garden tools
The other day I walked into a garden center and I saw displays of gardening tools for children. Oh, how this makes my heart happy. It’s becoming a lost tradition with kids. A tradition as old as time.  Gardening is another form of art, one we want to nurture and develop with our children, just like music and painting. The only difference is you’re creating with a living, breathing plant to making a picture. Whether it be with symmetrical rows of vegetables or a hodgepodge of wildflowers, you’re creating an image when you create a garden.
I believe when a child has the chance to play in the dirt, they’re happy. And nothing grabs the child’s imagination like planting seedlings, knowing it will row into a full size plant. Your child may even think he is planting the next giant beanstalk. The younger the child the more imagination you use in your gardening chores. Tell them the story as you plant, making it fun and interesting. For older children this is a perfect time to teach responsibilities and basic botany.
But I think the most important thing about gardening with your children is the time you spend  with them. Nothing binds people together more than getting dirty and sweaty working on a project. And let face it, in the summer heat you will get dirty and sweaty in the garden. You can moan and groan about it, or you can enjoy having your child work alongside of you. So what if he pulls up a posy instead of a weed? He’s trying, and that’s what counts. You can always teach them the right way, you can show him what are weeds and what are flowers.
fun garden statues
Take a walk through the garden center and pick up a small watering bucket, hoe, rake or shovel that were made for the hands of a child.  Get them involved in the planning of the garden and in the work. Let your children take part in selecting the plants or small statuary you might put in the garden. Let them have part of the fun. It might surprise you the artistic abilities children really have.
Our local botanical garden is putting in a child’s garden this year. If you’re not able to garden at your home, check into the local venues and see what they offer. Your local garden center selling those small gardening tools, may also offer classes or workshops for the kids. shutterstock_404041375
So, parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, family friends; take the time and pass down the love and joy of gardening to the next generation.

www.VictoriaLKWilliams.com