Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

Think Outside the Pot

Wait!
Don’t throw that out, it might be the perfect container for the Fairy Garden you’re making, or to be used as an unusual container for the garden.

beacg fg
It’s time we start thinking outside the pot. Look for different sources for containers and don’t always take the easy route. Simply pulling the first pot off the shelf can lead to ho-hum gardens. Why do this, when there are many other objects that could work really well as containers.
I can remember as a child, my grandfather taking an old tire, painting in the bright color and cutting the top part open making it look like a flower. Ta-da, my grandmother had a new planter and she would fill it with colorful pansies. Or what about the old fountain? You know, the one with the burned-out motor? Drain it, and create a statement planter.

fountplanter
Maybe for the generations before us, this practice wasn’t so much about looking for unusual containers as it was being responsible; recycling old items into new purposes. Perhaps it’s time we all started being responsible as well. With so many beautiful object available, if you use your imagination you could turn into a great planter.
Have you ever bought something you really liked, used it to serve its purpose for a short time and then you’re tired of? A perfect example is an old metal fire pit purchased before the propane firepits became so popular. Our customer uses the firepit for a year and decided they wanted to upgrade to the propane style. So, we cleaned up the old brass firepit and made a huge planter which now sits on a wrought iron stand and is focal point to their patio.

caladiumfiresigned
And just because a pot is broken doesn’t mean it needs to be thrown out, either. You’ve seen the pictures of a play pot laying on its side in a landscape bed with annuals just filling out across the ground? Once the flowers grow, the pot becomes a beautiful addition to the garden.
If you’re using a different container in your interiors, a simple way to avoid leakage is to line the bottom with heavy florist foil that will hold water and soil in. Don’t be afraid to try something completely different: a wood box, an old water bucket, an unused fountain or bird bath.
It’s time to start looking at the items around you in a different light; try to imagine a new use for something before you throw it away. That beautiful broken teapot, belonging to your grandmother, can be perfect for the miniature garden, or to hold an African Violet.

486397_439806389383364_1211560122_n

Those are a few tips & I hope they work for you…
remember; think outside the pot!

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

Nature has the final say!

Gardners.
They’re is different as night and day.

shutterstock_634527005

But there is one unifying factor that bonds us all together and that is the plants.
It always amazes me how gardeners seemed to be drawn to one another. It’s like some inner string is pulling us together to compare notes and admire each other’s work.
Above and beyond all of us enjoying time in the garden, each of us has their own flair of how we want our garden to be and how we go about achieving the look we want.

Some want to get right in there and work, placing each plant where it should go standing back and looking at it. Maybe moving a plant a couple inches, standing back to look again, until finally its time to plant. Then there are others that just randomly placed plants, letting them grow as nature would not so particular but still getting fantastic results.
And that’s the beauty of working with live plants. In all honesty the plants will, to a certain extant, do what they want to do. Regardless of how much time we take for placement and care we give them before planting. Nature has the final say.

ctsg11
Yes it’s important to plant where they will have plenty of room and where they can grow to their full potential. But each plant will grow differently. They have their structure they will follow, giving them they growth patterns we recognize for each species of plant. But there will always be a stray branch that will come off to the right of the left. One side might flower heavier than the other. They might have a bare spot or a twisted stem.
Each plant is just like you and me; it has its own individual personality. The more you spend time in the garden, the more you will come to understand your plants. I know that sounds crazy, but they do have their own way of adapting to where there planted.
There are plants that have a unusually fast growing season and may have a smaller lifespan because it has but so much into that season. Other plants may grow differently if placed in a stressful environment.  A great example of that is the geranium planted in a heavier shade: most often their the flowers will be fewer but when they do flower, it will be huge. Some plants such as Croton, that naturally have lots of bright colors, when planted in heavy shade will revert to be a green plant and have no added color to their foliage. This is nature’s way of adapting to their environment.

Flowering plants under stress from heat will slow down their production. The  same happens with fruit and vegetables. They will concentrate their growth on foliage which will feed the flowers, roots, and fruit. When a plant is under stress, it will produce what it needs for survival.
Some plants, when under extreme stress, or at the point of failure will suddenly burst out into flowers. This is a way of pro-creation. They strive to produce seeds for the next generation of the plant to grow.
So you can see that no matter how hard and how particular you are about placing your plants, it comes down to nature. The plant will grow the best way it can to thrive and flourish in the environment you’ve planted it in.

shutterstock_455083321

It’s your job to keep it growing, keep it healthy, and keep enjoying it. 

Victoria LK Williams

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

It’s not only about the plants.

There could be more your garden than just plants. Landscaping has a kissing-cousin called Hard-scaping.
Hard-scape is simply the use of non-plant material to create your garden.

gill2108sg
This can include walkways, structural components, stone accents, decorative containers, fountains, waterfalls, statuary and any other component you bring into your landscape that doesn’t have to be fed and fertilized. No matter what the size of a garden, a few pieces of hard-scape can add interest and contrast. Often making your plants even more attractive. A simple way for a small garden to add hard-scape is to add a decorative pot filled with flowers or an oversize boulder to contrast with landscape plants. In a larger area you might want to incorporate a walk. This could be a natural-looking path of mulch or a structured path of stone, gravel, or pavers.

ctsg38
Creating little nooks within your garden with the use of the bench or small water feature can take an average landscape and make it more personable and more enticing. The bench could set the tone for a traditional garden or a more contemporary look using a modern bench of bold color.
Even adding features such as a bistro set, a small swing, or fire pit are considered hard-scape. Not only do these items add interest your garden they also serve a purpose.
Maintenance on these materials is sometimes it’s simply cleaning them off from debris. Sometimes you don’t want to even do that much. To me, there’s nothing more appealing than an old rock that has moss growing in and out of its crevices. You don’t want mold growth because it can be slippery and dangerous. But moss or lichen can add a touch of age to your garden.
The addition of statuary or artwork is a personal decision. Statues range from all walks of life from cute little woodland creatures to an Oriental Buda. Spinners, which are metal artworks that move with the wind, adds not only beauty but the sense of movement.
Hard skating can be an expensive investment and is often a permanent investment. After all, who wants to dig up 5 yards of gravel after making a gravel pathway. So the decision needs to be designed properly for both the beauty it will provide but also the function it needs to achieve.

20170627_140031
If you’re adding a walkway, walk it. Find out where the most natural steps are so you’re not leading your guest to sharp turns against a wall. When you lay down the paver first steppingstone put it down and walk it so you’re not doing double steps to go from one paver to the next. You want it to be a smooth walking experience. Stone walls and retaining walls need to be properly installed to meet county regulations. If you have the expertise, great. If not, I would highly recommend hiring an expert. These walls not only need to look pretty but they’re there to function and hold back soil or sand from your garden.
Hard-scaping doesn’t always need to be a huge investment either. Sometimes you can walk around and find a beautiful piece of driftwood that can be incorporated into your garden. This looks nice if you have a bromeliad garden. A small birdbath added in the right area will catch the glint of the sun and attract birds.

frost 2018
Adding hard-scape material to your garden not only adds interest, but it also gives you the opportunity to add your own personal touch.

Victoria LK Williams

Botanical Concepts

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

A 6-pack of Flowers

Every gardener has their favorite flowers and shrubs. These are the ones we fall back on and use often. I have so many, but I thought I would pick six to share with you. These are not the typical geranium or petunias you often see in garden planters. Not there is anything wrong with either of those plants. The opposite is true, and I use them both and often.
But the following six flowers I like to use for special spots or containers. They may not be available all year long down here in the south, but when they are, you will find them on my plant pick list.
walsh kangaroo
Kangaroo Paw. This is a newish plant for me, and I am still becoming acquainted with it. It likes full sun, loose soil, and room to get some height. The foliage is a dark spikey green and the flower shafts rise from the center. The flower lasts for several weeks, paling as it matures. Multiple spikes will bloom at the same time. I have noticed that it does not like to be kept wet. Water thoroughly and let slightly dry between watering. A fertilizer for blooming flowers is necessary for continued spikes of flowers to be set. This plant can be mixed with other flowers or in a pot by itself.

cassandra
Cassandra. I love the deep salmon/peach color of these flowers. A plant that prefers light shade, it is a summer blooming plant. The flowers last, losing the lowest petals on the spike first. An interesting fact: if the flower spike is finished and water is applied to the spike, you can hear the popping of the seeds as they burst from the spike. Given the room, this plant can get 1-2 feet tall. Sniping off the dead spikes will promote fresh flowers. Because this plant is grown in lower light, do not over water.

con 18
Mona Lavender. One of my favorites! The spikes of delicate purple flowers are long lasting and the plant, when properly pinched back, will become a full mound of color. Although, not a true Lavender, the foliage has a slight scent when crushed. This plant will grow in winter sun or partial shade. Unless in a shady area for the summer, it will not survive the intense summer sun and the plant will decline. Also, during the summer, it attracts soft scale and mealy bugs. A pretty plant  by itself or mixed with other annuals. This also makes a great bedding plant.

dragon wing
Dragon Wing Begonia. The delicate drape to the foliage and the lacy appearance of the blossoms makes this plant a great hanging basket or a trailing flower in a container of mixed annuals. It is also good for under-planting a taller palm or flowering tree in a container. The flowers are available in red or a coral color. This begonia will limp along through the summer months but only in a shady location. It is best to cut the plant back as the heat begins, since the leaves will often turn thin and drop.

madavilla
Mandavillea Vine. The large trumpet flowers on this vine are a big attraction for butterflies, and if you’re lucky, humming birds. Available in white, several shades of pink and red, the flowers are slow to appear in cool weather. But the lush foliage makes up for the lack of flowers. I mix lower growing annals at the base to give extra color. Once the weather warms up, the flowers will show, and is best grown in full sun. The plant is a rapid grower and fertilizing with a blooming plant mix is important. Don’t be afraid to cut the climbing tendrils when they get out of hand. This will help the plant stay lush and produce flowers.

dipladenia
Dipladenia. Similar to the Mandavillea flowers. But this plant is a great producer of consistent flowers. Blooms will slow if the weather is too cold. The plant does best to keep a bit dry. Tendrils should be cut back to keep the plant full. Because the plant spreads with in a container, it is best used by itself. This plant will last through the summer months, but the sun will scorch the leaves. Pink is the most common color, but can be found in white and a deep pink/read.

So, there’s my six-pack.
I hope you can find a place for them in your garden. I’m sure you will enjoy these plants as much as I do.
Maybe they will become your favorites as well.

Victoria LK Williams

Botanical Concepts

 

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

The Summer Cut

Around the beginning of June/July you should see a difference in your landscape. That’s because it’s time for the summer cut back. Often this includes cutting plants back so hard, they look like there’s nothing left of them.
This is a common practice with landscape companies in our area. Although it doesn’t look great right after it happens, most plants will flourish under this type of pruning and come back looking strong by the end of the summer months.
That’s fine and dandy, but if you live here year-round it can sometimes be frustrating to look at sticks instead of lush bushes. From a business standpoint this is how the landscapers have to do it; they are rarely contracted to provide  selective pruning your plants. But there’s no reason why you can’t.
ctsg36
Some plants will survive without the summer cutback if you simply cut year-round. By selectively pruning branches as the plant grows, you can keep the plant at a nice year-round focus and shape. Plants like Dracaena Marginata, Ti Plants, Croton, and most trees  are perfect for this type. Even some of your hedging material such as Jasmine,   Hawthorns and Dwarf Ixora will maintain a good look if they are hedged periodically rather than a drastic cut back.
There are some plants such as Ornamental Grasses and Oleanders that thrive on the hard cut back and come back even stronger as a regrow.
It’s all a matter of knowing the plant structure and how it wants to grow naturally. If you have a plant that’s fast-growing and likes to spread, you may need to do more cutting or the drastic hard cutback to keep it looking full and thick.
ctsg11
But slower growing plants tend to do better with selective pruning. It’s easier to stay on top of them keeping their shape manageable.
So whether you’re doing a hard summer cutback, or selective pruning, there are a few things you need to do before you start…
First and most importantly, make sure your tools are clean and sharp. If you’re pruning large plants make sure the area around is clear so  when the branches drop they don’t damage any lower plants. When you’re done pruning, make sure you clean up the debris, don’t leave it there to die off on the fresh growth. The debris is a primary place for insects and fungus to develop,  you want to be sure to get all cuttings picked up and disposed of, because along with the heat in the summer comes the rainy season. And a combination of the two was perfect for the spread of insects and disease.
After you cut back is the perfect time to fertilize, providing you are not breaking any county ordinances. Some counties will not allow fertilizing during the summer because of fertilizer runoff into lagoons. If this is the case, then try to time your cutbacks so your pruning just before the ordinance timing starts. If you’ve missed that date then as soon as the ordinance timing ends, apply fertilizer on the plants.
It’s pretty hard to cut back too much down here in Florida, between the heat, the rain, and the type of plants, things flourish quickly. By the end of summer you’ll forget how the plants looked after a hard cutback.

tsullivan2018sg
So get out there and get your work done now before it gets too hot and then sit back, relax and enjoy your summer. 

Victoria LK Williams

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

What’s that I Smell?

When you look at a flower, a beautiful flower, an almost immediate reaction is to bend closer to it and take a sniff. Does it have a pleasant scent?
shutterstock_1048601843
From childhood we do this. I can remember holding the dandelions up to my chin or my nose and smelling, getting the pollen on the tip of my nose with giggling results.
We can plant herbs for the aroma. Their scent smoothing, soothing, and healing. Or we could plant herbs for the scent they add to your food. There are plants we plant because the smell repels animals that might harm our vegetable gardens.
But not every pretty flower has a pleasant scent. Not every person reacts the same way to the smell of every flower.
society garlic
A perfect example of this is Society Garlic. I love the flower. It’s airy and delicate, but the smell certainly isn’t delicate. You don’t have to get too close before you can smell the strong scent of garlic. So strong, it will take over your garden area. This is a plant that is best planted in the back corner or an area you may not wander into often, but can still see from a distance.
shutterstock_635835734
Even the most pleasant of scents like a Gardenia or Jasmine can affect people differently. I have more than one customer  tell  me they love the smell of gardenia, but when their entire bushes in bloom; they can’t be around it because it gives them headaches. The flower’s scent is too overwhelming.
Even some shrubs have distinctive smells. Juniper has one of the most distinctive smells, often reminding me of cat urine. Other people may not smell it, but I certainly do.
If you’re unsure of the smell from a shrub, (will bother you, or give you enjoyment) I would recommend buying a single plant. Place it where you plan on planting it and leave it there for a couple of days. (Don’t forget to water and take care of the plant while it waits to be planted!). Wander around the plant, especially in the early morning when the scent is usually the strongest. Determine whether it bothers you. Does it leave a pleasant or repugnant scent? It’s best to find out now; there’s nothing worse in planting an entire hedge and then discover you can’t stand the smell.

shutterstock_620972468
And don’t forget some plants don’t give off a scent all the time. For instance; Citrus Trees will only bloom around February and their scent is beautiful. But if you happen to be in the middle of a citrus grove during flowering season, you may find it’s too much.
Remember, some smells you may not like, could repel other things like pesky animals that might eat your garden, or insects that might bite you. Lemon grass and rosemary can repel mosquitoes and, although both produce a pleasant scent, too much of anything can be overwhelming.
So remember, your garden is more than just visual feast. There is also the sense of smell that has to come into play. And keep in mind; what you find attractive may not be attractive to your neighbor, so go easy on plants like Society Garlic.

https//:www.VictoriaLKWilliams.com

Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

Little Gardeners

 

shutterstock_123166279-1

I spent many hours helping my parents in our garden when I was younger, not always because I wanted to either. And my weekends weren’t always free from weeding and trimming; those are the times we went to help my grandparents with their garden work. All-in-all, they were happy memories, and they taught me a lot of good lessons about responsibility and how nature grows.
kids garden tools
The other day I walked into a garden center and I saw displays of gardening tools for children. Oh, how this makes my heart happy. It’s becoming a lost tradition with kids. A tradition as old as time.  Gardening is another form of art, one we want to nurture and develop with our children, just like music and painting. The only difference is you’re creating with a living, breathing plant to making a picture. Whether it be with symmetrical rows of vegetables or a hodgepodge of wildflowers, you’re creating an image when you create a garden.
I believe when a child has the chance to play in the dirt, they’re happy. And nothing grabs the child’s imagination like planting seedlings, knowing it will row into a full size plant. Your child may even think he is planting the next giant beanstalk. The younger the child the more imagination you use in your gardening chores. Tell them the story as you plant, making it fun and interesting. For older children this is a perfect time to teach responsibilities and basic botany.
But I think the most important thing about gardening with your children is the time you spend  with them. Nothing binds people together more than getting dirty and sweaty working on a project. And let face it, in the summer heat you will get dirty and sweaty in the garden. You can moan and groan about it, or you can enjoy having your child work alongside of you. So what if he pulls up a posy instead of a weed? He’s trying, and that’s what counts. You can always teach them the right way, you can show him what are weeds and what are flowers.
fun garden statues
Take a walk through the garden center and pick up a small watering bucket, hoe, rake or shovel that were made for the hands of a child.  Get them involved in the planning of the garden and in the work. Let your children take part in selecting the plants or small statuary you might put in the garden. Let them have part of the fun. It might surprise you the artistic abilities children really have.
Our local botanical garden is putting in a child’s garden this year. If you’re not able to garden at your home, check into the local venues and see what they offer. Your local garden center selling those small gardening tools, may also offer classes or workshops for the kids. shutterstock_404041375
So, parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, family friends; take the time and pass down the love and joy of gardening to the next generation.

www.VictoriaLKWilliams.com