Posted in gardening, The Southern Garden

What’s that I Smell?

When you look at a flower, a beautiful flower, an almost immediate reaction is to bend closer to it and take a sniff. Does it have a pleasant scent?
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From childhood we do this. I can remember holding the dandelions up to my chin or my nose and smelling, getting the pollen on the tip of my nose with giggling results.
We can plant herbs for the aroma. Their scent smoothing, soothing, and healing. Or we could plant herbs for the scent they add to your food. There are plants we plant because the smell repels animals that might harm our vegetable gardens.
But not every pretty flower has a pleasant scent. Not every person reacts the same way to the smell of every flower.
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A perfect example of this is Society Garlic. I love the flower. It’s airy and delicate, but the smell certainly isn’t delicate. You don’t have to get too close before you can smell the strong scent of garlic. So strong, it will take over your garden area. This is a plant that is best planted in the back corner or an area you may not wander into often, but can still see from a distance.
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Even the most pleasant of scents like a Gardenia or Jasmine can affect people differently. I have more than one customer  tell  me they love the smell of gardenia, but when their entire bushes in bloom; they can’t be around it because it gives them headaches. The flower’s scent is too overwhelming.
Even some shrubs have distinctive smells. Juniper has one of the most distinctive smells, often reminding me of cat urine. Other people may not smell it, but I certainly do.
If you’re unsure of the smell from a shrub, (will bother you, or give you enjoyment) I would recommend buying a single plant. Place it where you plan on planting it and leave it there for a couple of days. (Don’t forget to water and take care of the plant while it waits to be planted!). Wander around the plant, especially in the early morning when the scent is usually the strongest. Determine whether it bothers you. Does it leave a pleasant or repugnant scent? It’s best to find out now; there’s nothing worse in planting an entire hedge and then discover you can’t stand the smell.

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And don’t forget some plants don’t give off a scent all the time. For instance; Citrus Trees will only bloom around February and their scent is beautiful. But if you happen to be in the middle of a citrus grove during flowering season, you may find it’s too much.
Remember, some smells you may not like, could repel other things like pesky animals that might eat your garden, or insects that might bite you. Lemon grass and rosemary can repel mosquitoes and, although both produce a pleasant scent, too much of anything can be overwhelming.
So remember, your garden is more than just visual feast. There is also the sense of smell that has to come into play. And keep in mind; what you find attractive may not be attractive to your neighbor, so go easy on plants like Society Garlic.

https//:www.VictoriaLKWilliams.com

Author:

I live in a wonderful small town on the coast of Florida and have plenty of access to the beaches and Indian River. I am a proud Christian. I have great son & I married my best friend over 35 years ago. We have 2 cats. I have been in the landscape business for over 30 years and own a small Gardening Service called Botanical Concepts, providing design, installation and maintenance service for niche gardens. I am the author of the fictional cozy mysteries and a writing blog (www.VictoriaLKWilliams.blog). I love to read, walk, garden, watch good movies, enjoy nature and love chocolate and a good cup of coffee!! Did I say I like chocolate?

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